Elly Gannon

The study I am currently conducting looks at the effects of physical fatigue on spatial attention. Past research has shown that mental fatigue results in a rightward shift in spatial attention. Based on this research, we have hypothesised that physically induced fatigue will produce the same rightward shift in spatial attention, and therefore one will neglect the left field of attention. The study is also testing whether physical fatigue, due to exercise, will cause a narrowing of attention, or a “tunnel vision” in participants
Supervisors: Dr Tobias Loetscher and A/Prof Gaynor Parfitt (School of Health Sciences)

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Megan Grech

I am working with stroke patient data at Guide Dogs SA/NT.  I am investigating the sensitivity of different neuropsychological tests to predict spatial neglect behaviour, a common consequence of stroke. Current clinical tests involving simple paper and pencil tasks are not thought to be sensitive enough to detect subtle forms of neglect behaviour in stroke patients. We put this to the test by comparing the performance in the paper and pencil tests to the performance in a walking task.        
Supervisor: Dr Tobias Loetscher and Lindy Williams (School of Health Sciences)

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Anne Macnamara

I am currently researching how people process small and large magnitudes – specifically, how they spatially map risk judgements. My research involves measuring risk associations from both an objective and subjective perspective.
Supervisors: Dr Hannah Keage and Dr Tobias Loetscher

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Felicity-Eve Pearce

My current research involves investigating evidence of Cognitive Reserve in resting state electroencephalography (EEG). While Cognitive reserve is applicable to a wide variety of cognitive impairments, my specific research is looking for evidence of cognitive reserve within resting state EEG’s of the elderly population. Other areas of interest include; investigating early indicators of dementia and Neurotherapy.
Supervisor: Dr Hannah Keage

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Emily Rosenich

I am investigating the role of reading direction in shaping visuo-spatial perception and numerical representation. More specifically, I am interested in the flexibility of these systems, and whether long-term ‘spatial biases’ proposed to partly derive from continual use and/or exposure to a particular reading-writing direction, can change in response to brief exposure to mirror-reversed text.
Supervisor: Dr Tobias Loetscher

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